Better Together

Let’s talk race

Written by PRSA Oregon Diversity & Inclusion Committee

The tragic death of George Floyd has energized the Black Lives Matter movement across this nation and the world. White people are being forced to listen and see examples of systemic racism in the mainstream media, on public opinion platforms and in their neighborhoods for the first time in decades. Compound the deep racial tensions with a pandemic that is infecting Black people and people of color disproportionately right now, and we as public relations professionals have a high-stakes level of complexity to communicate as we guide our organizations and businesses. 

Having go-to resources to access quickly are key to our daily tactics and long-term objectives. PRSA Oregon’s Diversity and Inclusion committee offers members tools they can count on to be timely and relevant. Here are a few examples:

Audio

Here’s a podcast series by Kimberle Crenshaw, an American civil rights advocate, who explores equity issues that are occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic. In a May 12 episode, she and her guests examine the central role that ideological whiteness plays in the U.S. response to COVID-19. Meanwhile, in a May 19 podcast, guests discuss vote suppression, state violence, vigilantism and fatal public health experiments in the state of Georgia.

Web 

Why is it so hard for people from the dominant group to talk about racism? There are social barriers. There is fear. It’s an uncomfortable topic. Talking about race and racism risks being called a racist. These are just some of the reasons white people don’t talk about race. Here’s a Washington Post news story and tips to start this conversation in a time that is demanding white people to pay attention and take action.

Video 

Dr. Robin DiAngelo is a lecturer, author and 20-year trainer on racial and social justice issues. She frequently lectures about White Fragility — defensive moves that the dominant group makes when confronted with race. Fear, guilt and anger are some of the behaviors that often shut down conversations, making it impossible for dialogues across racial groups, while protecting the white status quo.

A little bit of everything

Here’s a full list of anti-racist resources from movies, podcasts, books and videos to kid’s books and organizations to follow on social media.

 
 
Let's talk race
 
Event: Communicators’ role in interrupting racism in the workplace
 
Join PRSA Oregon’s Diversity and Inclusion committee in a forum to coach communicators in interrupting racism in the workplace on Tuesday, August 11, at 11:30 a.m. PST! Serilda Summers-McGee, MBA, M.Ed, founder of Workplace Change, will share tips through case studies and answer your questions about racism in the workplace.
 
Tickets are on sale now! Register on Eventbrite.

Reverse Mentoring: Learn from PRSSA!

Reverse Mentoring: Learn from PRSSA!Whether you’ve been in the industry for years or have just started your professional journey, we all could use fresh perspectives, a new lens or diverse ideas to become a more complete practitioner. What better way to tap into all three than to harken back to your time in the college classroom. Remember it? That time where you could just think, uninterrupted? Well we’re happy to take you back. Follow our PRSSA members across the state as they share new perspectives with our “Reverse Mentoring Series.” That’s right, you’ve mentored so much, so now, sit back in your proverbial lecture-hall chair and listen. These tips might give you just the refresh you need.
 
As part of our Reverse Mentoring Series we’ll tackle one topical buzzword each month. For June, it’s sustainability. 
 
Many of us question whether sustainability initiatives will change as a result of COVID-19. We’ve also questioned whether social distancing, virtual connection, working from home, wearing masks are all sustainable. It’s a noun that can take on many different meanings. For Lucy Thompson, a junior at the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University Vancouver, sustainability is about stamina. Listen as she shares tips to “sustaining” your stamina in the workplace.
PRSA Oregon Partner Mac's List Offers COVID-19 Resources

PRSA Oregon Partner Mac’s List Offers COVID-19 Resources

Breaking Down the PESO Model

Breaking Down the PESO ModelContributed by PRSA Oregon partner Allen Hall PR,
University of Oregon

 

 

The PESO model is a visual representation of the four types of media combined for a successful PR campaign. The model was created by Gini Dietrich who founded and co-authors the blog Spin Sucks and has years of communications industry wisdom under her belt. PESO stands for Paid, Earned, Shared and Owned Media. Each type of media is important to build brand awareness and see results. If all four types of media are created and maintained successfully, according to Dietrich, “it can help you establish authority… [which] means you’re a thought leader.”

Paid media refers to the sponsored content seen online, social media ads and other digital marketing options. This option does not have to break the bank. Set aside a small budget and choose to sponsor a piece of content that represents the brand well. Test out what content works well for your brand and what doesn’t. Eventually, trends will start to show about what is effective, and then more money can be confidently put into these advertisements. 

Earned media is the traditional media relations that the PR world has been doing for decades. Getting your brand’s name in print from a third-party source is obviously still an excellent way to build credibility for your brand. With the ever-growing communications field and the dwindling number of journalists, building and maintaining relationships with the press is crucial to success in earned media. 

Shared media (which some people combine with owned media) is social media. This is the content that is going on all the brand’s social platforms. To be successful, content needs to be creative, authentic and posted regularly. Brands need to be active on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest for starters, be a part of conversations about the industry the brand works in and have a clear and developed brand voice that makes content stand out. Right now on Instagram especially, but also Facebook and Snapchat, stories are where users spend a lot of their time on the apps. Therefore, brands need to be creating content every day that can be added to the brand’s story. Make it interactive with a poll or a question to get users more engaged. Make sure to follow trends and work out how the brand’s voice can contribute to them.

Owned media is content that the brand produces itself. A lot of this media likely resides on the brand’s website. These are things like a blog, a podcast, photo series, stories written by people from the brand, and any other content created in-house that is not on social media. Owned media is where the brand has the most freedom to tell its own story. However, the other three types of media are essential for creating credibility. 

Intersections of Journalism and PR

Intersections of Journalism and PR

Contributed by PRSA Oregon partner
Allen Hall PR,
University of Oregon

 

 

Public relations professionals come from a variety of backgrounds with an array of expertise. A common background for those currently working in PR often begins with journalism. The two fields have similar core characteristics that make the skills learned in a journalism career easily transferable to the PR world and vice versa. The following are a few of the many components journalism and public relations have in common. 

Communication 

PR and journalism deal directly with communication. They also share a common audience – the public. It is the job of the PR representative as well as the journalist to serve as a public informant with pertinent information. The entire idea behind the two professions is that the public can look to these people and know they are going to be kept up to date with the news occurring around them. Whether it is an article in the local newspaper or a press release from Google, PR professionals and journalists alike are constantly sharing information with the public. 

Pitching 

Pitching is one of the biggest components when it comes to PR and journalism. Both professions call for the sharing of ideas and this is generally when PR professionals and journalists will interact the most. In PR, most pitching is done to the media, meaning PR professionals must convince journalists that a story pertaining to their brand is good enough to be shared with the public and categorized as newsworthy. In journalism, it comes down to pitching stories to an editor and convincing them that the story is worth letting the public know about. Being able to pitch a story and have it get picked up by a journalist or the media outlet itself is a strong skill that is constantly used in both professions. 

Storytelling

PR and journalism are fields in which the professional tells a story. On one hand, the PR representative is telling the story of a brand while journalists are telling the story of the people. PR generally tells that story to the public in the form of campaigns and products while journalists will use media as the primary source of communication. PR storytelling is more end goal-focused while journalism deals less with strategic communication. In the end, the core characteristic remains the same. Both professions call for storytelling as a vital skill that is at the heart of communication. 

Trust

In both PR and journalism, trust is essential. Trust between the communicator and the public is crucial for PR and journalism to survive – it is also one of the most important components in each profession’s code of ethics. In PR you must have the trust of the public in order to maintain a mutually beneficial relationship. In journalism, you must operate as a non-bias “watchdog” in order to share facts and truth with your audience. If there is ever a mistake or mix-up, professionals in both fields are expected to come forward and state their wrong because, without transparency, both professions would lose vital audience trust. 

October is Global Diversity Awareness Month

Leadership Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: Strategies for Equitable Communication

Leadership Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: Strategies for Equitable Communication

Looking to craft communications that break through cultural barriers? Learn hands-on strategies to make sure your communications keeps pace with the diversity of your audience. Hear from Diversity, Equity and Inclusion industry leaders Joy Fowler, MBA, VP of Diversity & Inclusion Manager at Umpqua Bank and Gail Dundas, MS, APR, Fellow PRSA, Communications Consultant.

Limited seating! Register via PRSA Oregon Eventbrite today!

Leadership Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: Strategies for Equitable Communication

On Health and Wellness: My one tip to prepare for conferences

On Health and Wellness: My one tip to prepare for conferences

by Mark Mohammadpour, APR

The PRSA International Conference (ICON) is October 20-22 in San Diego. Every year I attend, I learn new things, meet new people and leave inspired to play a larger role in advancing the profession and the professional.

The reality of conferences like ICON, however, is that we are sitting a lot, eating (too) well, and forgetting to take care of ourselves. If you want to prioritize your health and wellness during conferences like ICON, I have one tip: spend 15 minutes before your trip to prepare.

Business travel can increase stress. Managing what to pack, finalizing travel logistics, and organizing the meeting schedule are just three examples we see our stress levels rising!

To compound the issue, once we arrive, long days at conferences cause our guard to be let down at night, which can lead to poor eating decisions. We forget that the following morning, our body might not recover right away, we’re already on the back foot and by the time we get home, we feel like we’re back at step one.

On Health and Wellness: My one tip to prepare for conferences

Before you leave for your next trip, spend 15 minutes and answer two key questions:

  • How will you prepare for your meals? Spend a few minutes before your trip and research when and where you’re going to eat. 
  • Are you scheduled to have dinner at a specific restaurant? Research the menus online and determine what you want to eat before you arrive, so you do not need to add another decision while you’re traveling.

On Health and Wellness: My one tip to prepare for conferences

  • How will you make time to incorporate exercise? The hotel that hosts ICON has a map that includes one-, two- and three-mile walking/running routes, so I am already prepared before I head to San Diego. I also bring a resistance band on my trips, which I use in my room with simple dynamic stretching exercises to loosen up my body before I start my day. These exercises warm up my muscles and makes me feel accomplished and mentally and physically prepared for the day ahead.

If you spend a few minutes preparing for your upcoming business trip, you will be all set mentally and physically for a great time.

I look forward to seeing you at ICON!

About the Author
Mark Mohammadpour, APR is a strategic communications executive, certified personal trainer and health coach. His company, Chasing the Sun, offers health coaching tailored for public relations professionals. Mark will be presenting a workshop at ICON, titled “Living Our Best #PR Life Through Fitness, Health and Wellness.” Visit chasingthesunpdx.com, email him at [email protected], listen to his podcast at anchor.fm/markmoh, or follow him on Instagram or Twitter.

*Photos courtesy Celeste Wechter Photography

*Top photo by Tim Goedhart on Unsplash

PRSA Oregon honors aspiring PR pre-professionals

For nearly two decades, the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and Communication has called upon our the PRSA Oregon chapter to jury the Jack Ewan Award for Outstanding Public Relations Senior. This year, we were also invited to judge the Liz Cawood Award for Service to UO PRSSA and the Community.

A member of the faculty from 1964 until his retirement in 1985, Ewan is credited with building the UO’s public relations courses into an accredited major. He was responsible for the founding of the first Public Relations Student Society of America Chapter (PRSSA) at the University of Oregon, the first in the Northwest District.

The Jack Ewan Award is presented each year to the outstanding senior member of the Public Relations Student Society of America, University of Oregon Chapter. The award recognizes both achievement and potential in a senior student and is named in honor of Jack Ewan, Professor Emeritus, and founder of the University of Oregon Chapter of PRSSA. The award is sponsored by the Oregon Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA).

The Liz Cawood Award is also presented each year to a member of the Public Relations Student Society of America, University of Oregon Chapter, for outstanding commitment to service to PRSSA and the community at large.  The award is named in honor of Liz Cawood, first UO PRSSA professional advisor and a founding member of the Greater Oregon Chapter of PRSA. The award is sponsored by Cawood.

Liz Cawood, president of Cawood, a communications and PR firm in Eugene and a longtime supporter of the SOJC, worked with Ewan to found the local PRSA chapter as well as the PRSSA chapter at the school. She says she remembers fondly “talking with Ewan about public relations strategies.”

This year’s jury for each award comprised Mary Ann Albright, Compliance Communications Manager at Kaiser Permanente; Kathy Hubbell, APR, Fellow PRSA, President of Adscripts; and Dianne Danowski Smith, APR, Fellow PRSA, President of Publix Northwest PR – PA.

In this academic year, two excellent candidates were chosen, each receiving a monetary award as part of the esteemed designations. Each displayed excellent academic performance as well as strong goals for their post-graduation lives. The winner was announced at the J-School’s commencement ceremony on June 16.

Lily Gordon was named the 2019 Ewan award winner. Lily was honored for making significant contributions to the UO PRSSA chapter as a member and officer.

PRSA Oregon honors aspiring PR pre-professionals

She sought out development opportunities not only for herself, but also for her peers. She’s had demonstrable successes in social media PR (gaining national attention for the chapter’s “Ducks Love Dogs” fundraiser) and is keen to embrace emerging technologies. That adaptability will position her to be successful in an evolving profession.

Lily has a clear sense of her values and has been found to be an ambitious and gifted emerging professional. Equity, education, and the environment are important to her. She’s wise enough to understand that she needn’t, as a college senior, know exactly where her career path will ultimately take her. Lily has accomplished a great deal while at UO and has honed her leadership skills through PRSSA. With a great job already lined up for after graduation, Lily has a bright future ahead of her.

Jillian Niedermeyer was named winner of the Liz Cawood award. The judges note not only Jillian’s acceptance into honors programs but active involvement with the PR community on- and off-campus demonstrates an understanding of two key ingredients in a successful career launch: experience and relationships.

PRSA Oregon honors aspiring PR pre-professionalsShe has varied interests and found creative ways to link them professionally – identifying opportunities to combine her passion for events PR with her love of technological innovations. She already has a position secured after graduation at a PR firm that will allow her to explore this intersection more fully.

Jillian has been active on campus, helping to orient fellow transfer students and to plan and execute events for the UO PRSSA chapter. She also immersed herself in Allen Hall Public Relations, where she gained valuable real-world experience and networked with PRSA Oregon chapter members. Additionally, she broadened her horizons by participating in the Semester at Sea program.

Both Lily and Jillian served as Account Executives at Allen Hall Public Relations, the UO PR program’s in-house agency. Congratulations to Lily and Jillian, we can’t wait to see your stars arise!

 

From Our President: A Great Start to 2019!

From Our President: A Great Start to 2019!

From Our President: A Great Start to 2019!It’s been a productive start to 2019 for PRSA Oregon’s board of directors. I’m excited about the enthusiasm, energy, and great work being done by the chapter’s leaders and committee volunteers.

The PRSA Oregon board just finished its 2019 strategic plan. That plan is a built around a vison of PRSA Oregon as a thriving statewide chapter.  It includes four priorities that will guide our work and investments this year: membership value, engagement, leadership and excellence.

One of the board’s most important priorities as a thriving statewide professional association is to serve our members and support their professional development. We are committed to delivering quality programs, events and activities that are relevant and timely, that serve your professional interests, and provide value for your investment. Especially important is to ensure the chapter’s professional development activities are accessible by members throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington.

Our members want to build professional networks, belong to something larger, and to make a difference.  An old proverb says, ‘you reap what you sow.’ What you give to your career and profession comes back to benefit you. It means being seen and heard and getting involved.

Here are some options to consider:

  • Volunteer for a PRSA committee .
  • Volunteer for our signature Communicator’s Conference on May 3.
  • Make time to attend a PRSA event, meet new professionals, and grow your network.
  • Advance your skills through contributed articles for the chapter newsletter.
  • Share your wisdom and experience through PRSA Oregon’s professional mentoring or APR readiness review.

The chapter offers many ways for you to connect, be involved and make a difference. Take that next step! It will make a difference—to your career, to our chapter, and our professional community.

The board of directors is committed to effective leadership and being good stewards of our chapter resources.  We strive to be the best leaders we can be, to mentor emerging leaders, and to use continuous quality improvement to evaluate and adapt our practices for the best results for our members and the organization.

Join us in advancing your career and helping to make this a great year for PRSA Oregon and the communities we serve.

Be sure to connect with PRSA Oregon on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and PRSAOregon.com.

Warmest regards,

Julie Reed, M.S., APR
President, PRSA Oregon

Don’t Miss Out on CommCon Earlybird Savings! Chuck Gose and Suzanne Stevens announced as 2019 keynotes — Join us May 3!

This year, We’re pleased to welcome two keynote speakers, Chuck Gose and Suzanne Stevens. Chuck is a strategic communication thought leader, an advisor with top employee communications platform socialchorus, and host of the Icology and Culture, Comms, and Cocktails podcasts as well as the Chuck Chats series with bananatag.

Suzanne is the Editor of the Portland Business Journal, Portland’s leading business-focused publication. Suzanne spent seven years as a senior editor at The Deal in New York, where she wrote about corporate mergers and acquisitions. Suzanne also spent time as an associate editor at Oregon Business Magazine and 12 years working in public radio at stations in Kentucky and North Carolina, where she was a frequent contributor to National Public Radio.

Tickets are now available at the EARLYBIRD rate!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-communicators-conference-tickets-56504750229