Why Volunteer?

Whatever the reason you volunteer – learning, networking, mentoring, career growth, social engagement, bettering the community, an overactive hypothalamus – it is, indeed more blessed to give than to receive.

Take it from your 2018 PRSA Oregon Chapter Volunteer of the Year.

2018 PRSA Oregon Volunteer of the Year with Immediate Past President Brian Terrett

“I volunteer for all these reasons and more,” said Madeline Turnock, APR, strategic communications and partnerships advisor for Concordia University-Portland. “I feel I’ve gained much more from PRSA than I’ve given, after more than 20 years of involvement with PRSA, earning accreditation, serving on the board and committees, attending events, paying annual dues, and taking more than one hiatus when life or family called.”

Turnock credits her employers, colleagues, and mentors along the way for supporting her. She also shared that this year’s seven-member Spotlight Committee was among the most rewarding experiences because each volunteer was clear about what they wanted to contribute and had time to contribute, followed through, and carved out time to get to know each other and support each other professionally.

No matter what your personal reasons may be for membership, participation, and volunteering in PRSA, continue to put your job and family first, and then take that effort one step beyond to advance the profession.

Thank you to all our PRSA volunteers for giving of their time, talent and treasure.

 

*Pictured at top: 2018 PRSA Oregon Volunteers in attendance at the November 28 Annual Meeting!

Annual Meeting November 29 Available via Webscast!

PRSA Oregon Annual Meeting

November 29 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

If you cannot attend, click HERE to join the meeting via webcast at 6 p.m.

Celebrate PRSA’s Oregon’s inaugural year as a statewide chapter. The PRSA Oregon annual meeting will take place  Thursday, November 29 at the U of O Turnbull Center, 70 NW Couch St., Portland, OR 97209, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

Agenda: Networking (5:30 to 6:00 p.m.); 6:00 – 7:00 p.m.: President’s remarks and board recognition, volunteer recognition, election results, and President-Elect’s remarks.  Complimentary hors-d’oeuvres. FREE.

 

A match made in heaven: PRSA Oregon sponsors realize new partnership opportunity

PRSA is a great place to learn about new trends in the field and meet others on the same journey. And being a part of the Oregon chapter can also present opportunities, such as those that two of our chapter’s long-term sponsors discovered while talking at this year’s Communicators Conference.

Craig Walker has managed FlashAlert Newswire for almost 40 years. 740 police, fire, school, city, state, military and general public relations organizations in the Portland TV market alone use FlashAlert—and it operates in half a dozen other markets. Just in Portland, FlashAlert disseminates more than 30 news releases each day, covering all media in the Pacific Northwest.

Mike James of Your News Inc. has worked in the media monitoring business for 21 years, going back to his Moba Media days. Police, fire, city, state, public utilities and public relation organizations in Oregon and across the United States use his monitoring service to discover what TV, radio, newspapers and online outlets ran your story.

Both companies have financially supported PRSA Oregon chapters for more than a decade.

Craig’s clients occasionally ask about monitoring. And Mike gets inquiries about local newswires. It was a match made in heaven: FlashAlert collects and distributes news while Your News Inc. tracks and provides a report of where it was used. They realized how well their services complement each other – with no overlap.

FlashAlert now has the ability to trigger media monitoring on a single story or everything that it posted. Your News Inc. sets up an account for you and then reports on where the story was aired, published or posted.

“It’s a great relationship, with FlashAlert taking clients from A to M, then Your News Inc. taking them from M to Z,”  Craig says.

Learn more about FlashAlert at www.flashalert.net and Your News Inc. at www.yournewsinc.net. Please check out our sponsors’ offerings: They may be just what you or your client need.

Congrats 2018 Spotlight Award Winners & Awards of Distinction Honorees!

by Madeline Turnock, APR
Chair, PRSA Oregon Spotlight Awards & Past President, PRSA Portland Chapter

Strategic Communications & Partnerships, Concordia University-Portland

Thank you to all those who attended the PRSA Oregon 2018 Spotlight Awards! We were thrilled to recognize another year of premier communication campaigns and professionals in the presence of nearly 200 guests at the Multnomah Athletic Club on Nov. 7.

We showcased the excellent work of our Spotlight and Merit awardees, and recognized our four distinguished professionals with Awards of Distinction, including Mary Louise VanNatta, APR, Donna Z. Davis, Gary Withers, and Nicole Shaddy. Congratulations to newly accredited members Jaimee Mayfield, APR, and Rhonda Morin, APR, and to College of Fellows inductee: Brian Terrett, APR, PRSA Fellow.

We hope you enjoyed the photo booth images, and, in addition, click HERE for photographer Tim Horn’s professional images made available for free download. See the awards program and full list of award winners and honorees HERE. (View in 2-page mode for easier reading).

Thank you to all our PRSA Oregon volunteers, especially our Spotlight committee members – JoJoe Nujoy, Thelma Hale,  Denise Fornberg, Meghan Zea, McKinsey Redmond, Vicki Guinn, Sally Ridenour, and Alyssa Giaimo.

If you missed this year’s event, we hope you’ll join us next year. In the meantime, visit us on social media @PRSAOregon and @prsa_oregon. Participation and membership in PRSA – advancing the profession, upholding our code of ethics, and honoring outstanding work – is more important and meaningful than ever. See you in two weeks at the Annual Meeting on Nov. 29.

Manage Your Brand! Lessons Learned from the PRSA North Pacific District Conference

Prioritizing Your Personal PR

by Mary Ann Albright

We devote so much time and energy to building and protecting our employer’s reputation that our own personal brand can risk becoming the proverbial cobbler’s children with no shoes.

At the recent PRSA North Pacific District conference in Seattle, Nicole Leverich made the case for why it’s so essential to actively manage your personal brand. Nicole, who serves as senior director of corporate communications for LinkedIn, offered practical tips on how to strategically maximize your LinkedIn profile.

A current, carefully curated LinkedIn profile is practically a necessity at this point, whether you’re just beginning your career or are already established.

Nicole’s presentation opened the conference, and it came full circle on the last day during a breakout session led by Kelly Guenther and Chad Lakin of the video company Shootsta. Kelly is a video specialist, and Chad is Shootsta’s vice president for North America.

How to Maximize Your LinkedIn Presence:

1. Photo. Choose a professional-looking profile photo to help bring your page to life. Don’t forget to choose a custom background photo as well. If nothing springs to mind, a cityscape is always a nice option. A unique background photo shows that you’re being thoughtful with your image and aren’t passively settling for LinkedIn’s default blue photo.

2. Location. According to LinkedIn’s tips guide, including the city where you’re based makes you stand out up to 23 times more in searches.

3. Industry. Choose the appropriate industry category (e.g., “Public Relations and Communications” or “Marketing and Advertising”), so that people can easily identify your primary field of interest.

4. Summary. Think of your summary as your elevator pitch. It’s how you want to be positioned in the minds of prospective employers/clients/contacts. It should be at least 40 words in length.

5. Experience. You don’t want your LinkedIn profile to read like a résumé. Make the descriptions of your various roles more conversational vs. a bulleted list copied and pasted directly from your résumé.

6. Media. Upload photos, videos, presentations, and other non-proprietary work samples to showcase what you bring to the table. As Nicole noted, don’t feel like you need to have been the sole contributor to a project to share it on your profile. Most complex projects take a village, which people understand.

Finding impactful work samples to share when your primary focus is internal communications can be challenging. But as Nicole pointed out, most major internal campaigns have some external-facing element that can be representative of the project.

7. Education. Fill in your degree type, areas of study, and alma mater. LinkedIn members who list educational information on their profile receive up to 11 times more views, according to a company tips sheet.

8. Skills. You can pin up to three skills to highlight as top skills that appear prominently on your profile. Be thoughtful about which skills you choose, and how you order them. This will likely change throughout your career, so revisit this section regularly to make sure the emphasis is where you want it to be right now.

9. Endorsements. Skill endorsements are votes of confidence from other LinkedIn members. They lend credibility to your profile.

If your endorsements aren’t for the skills you want to highlight, ask people you’ve had positive working experiences with if they’d feel comfortable endorsing you for specific skills. You can offer to do the same for them.

Endorsement are quick and easy to give with the click of a button.

10. Recommendations. These are written statements from LinkedIn members endorsing you. They provide detail and context that skill endorsements do not. You can ask contacts for recommendations through LinkedIn, and you can also proactively give recommendations to others.

11. Volunteering. Employers like to see that candidates give back and make a contribution to their community. Be sure to add a section listing your volunteer experience. The causes you support help paint a picture of what you value.

12. Connecting and following. Best practice is to only connect on LinkedIn with people you actually know. But for people (or companies) you admire or want to get to know, following them is a great option. Following your organization’s competitors can also yield useful insights.

Nicole recommended following these influencers:
a. Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and co-founder of Microsoft
b. Jack Welch, executive chairman of the Jack Welch Management Institute
c. Richard Branson, founder of Virgin Group
d. Priyanka Chopra, actress and philanthropist
e. Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn

13. Updates and publishing. Nicole likens LinkedIn updates to Tweets, and the publishing platform to blogging.

Updates (which can be photo or video as well as text) are a quick way to build your brand while sharing things you find interesting and hope others will too.

Publishing is long-form (4+ paragraphs) and should be reserved for deeper explorations of topics about which you’re passionate.

Anything you publish becomes part of your profile and is shared with your network, unlike updates. So that content should be workshopped and fine-tuned.

Nicole recommends setting as a goal 1-3 updates per week, and 1 published post per month.

In the Shootsta presentation, Kelly discussed the power of video – and how it’s easy to capture quality video on your smartphone using a few tips and tricks like the AE/AF lock, shooting horizontally, and investing in a tripod or gimbal for stabilization.

He encourages people to share video updates on LinkedIn. You can either record video directly through the LinkedIn app, or you can save it to your phone then upload it to LinkedIn.

14. Integrating with personal websites. Gone are the days of going to a job interview with a physical portfolio. More and more, companies want and expect to see a digital portfolio.

If you have one, integrate it with your LinkedIn profile. You can list your personal website’s URL in your LinkedIn profile, and you can link to your LinkedIn profile from your website. This creates a loop of information showcasing you and your work.

There are many different content management platforms, and each is different. With Squarespace, for example, you can add a social links block to your website that will display the LinkedIn icon and hyperlink to your profile. You can also choose to automatically push content you add to Squarespace to LinkedIn.

15. Check your settings. Check your LinkedIn account settings and adjust as desired. For example, you might not want your profile edits broadcast to your whole network. There’s also a feature you can enable that will discreetly let recruiters know that you’re open.

Additionally, you can customize your profile’s URL, so it’s something clean like www.linkedin.com/in/yourname.

 

 

2018 Annual Membership Meeting Recap

Annual Membership Meeting & Elections Goes Virtual

On Nov. 8, 2017, PRSA Oregon hosted its first annual membership meeting and election results via webinar to celebrate this founding year’s efforts and next year’s elected leaders with 22 members joining online (of 32 registered attendees).
The 2018 board of directors slate was announced on Oct. 24 and voting was open through Nov. 7 via electronic ballot, 16 days in advance of the annual meeting in accordance with chapter bylaws, during which 48 members voted.
New Board Elected Unanimously
Twenty-two of the 32 registered members for this event cast their vote, forming a majority of annual meeting registrants. All nominations passed unanimously (Note: abstaining was not available on a role-by-role basis).  The election results are announced here.
The electronic voting and virtual meeting was a different format than chapter’s have done in the past and was very well received by the 22 members (+ seven of us in “green room”) who tuned in and engaged via chat throughout the webinar.
Attendee comments include:

Eric Jones: This e-meeting is great! Highlight of the year so far

Sherryll Hoar: Good way to hold a statewide meeting. Thanks.

Andrew Thompson: Great Kimmel reference, Colby.

Kathy Hubbell, APR, Fellow PRSA: This is a great way to hold a meeting!

Andrew Thompson: I’m excited to be a part of this organization. Thanks to the 2017 board for your leadership. Excited for 2018!

Elisa Williams: Great job you guys on this meeting.

During the webinar, presenters from the board reported on the following in addition to recap posts shared on our blog as linked:
  • Welcome & Overview – 2017 President Colby Reade, APR
  • Business Meeting
    • Assembly Report – Assembly Delegate Dianne Danowski-Smith, APR, Fellow PRSA
    • Treasurer’s Report – Treasurer Dave Thompson, APR
    • Membership Report – Membership Director Siobhan Taylor
  • 2017 Transition Accomplishments – 2017 President-Elect Julie Williams, APR, MA
  • Election Results – 2017 President-Elect Julie Williams & Service Director Taylor Long
  • Looking Ahead to 2018 – 2018 President Brian Terrett
  • Q & A – 2017 President Colby Reade, APR
It is not possible to recap in 60 minutes the 3,500+ hours of volunteer efforts contributed this year. Overall, these collective efforts were well represented even as time constraints limited presenter’s from appreciating every person’s and teams’ contributions.
To learn more about reports, accomplishments and plans, review the PowerPoint presentation (Note: large file due to imagery), listen to the the webinar and/or watch the webinar (skip ahead to beginning at 00:26:30) .
Upcoming Service Celebration
We can look forward to celebrating with all volunteers on Dec. 12, 5:30-7 pm, when we gather in the back room of Rogue Brewery & Distillery in NW Portland. Event details will be sent directly to volunteers and up on the website very soon.

Final Transition Steering Committee Report: October

Finishing Strong

At our final Transition Steering Committee meeting for 2017, we took a few minutes to celebrate the momentum we’ve built. We’ve been so busy working on projects, that I think even we were surprised by everything that our newly formed regional chapter had accomplished when we reflected upon the year.

As the final report of year, let’s take some time to review the details of the journey, directly leading to the plans for next year. This will be a long post, but I think you’ll be reassured and reminded that we apply the same passion and process to running the chapter as we do to our profession.

One-Year Plan Turns Into Two

In March, we had gathered in the same conference room at Make-A-Wish to review all of the commitments and programs grandfathered in by the former chapters, along with all of the transition tasks, that needed to be considered in combining the three local chapters that had served Oregon and SW Washington for the last 60 years.  There were nearly 100.  

At the time, we determined we couldn’t pursue them all this year. We resolved to undertake the transition over two phases in two years and prioritized projects for 2017 that best set up the chapter for success and that would ultimately bring the most value to our members.

Phase One: Nearly Complete

Work on phase one projects is nearly complete.  As we wrap up in November, last steps are to:

  • Back up and redirect the former chapters’ websites to the new PRSA Oregon website;
  • Finalize an inventory of the chapter’s accounts and subscriptions;
  • Complete the updated Policies and Procedures document compilation;
  • Send out chapter pins to founding members who didn’t attend events where they were distributed (please email your address to membership@prsaoregon.org if you need your pin sent to you!);
  • Reconcile final expenses from the former chapters to complete for the final annual income statement and balance sheet of the chapter’s finances;
  • Hold an orientation in November of newly elected board members;
  • And, have a virtual annual membership meeting & elections in November so everyone can attend!
Phase Two in 2018

We’ve also clearly defined what needs to get done next year as part of phase two of the transition. We have a well-documented road map built off our 2017 action plan to share with the incoming board during orientation.

This plan will guide the newly formed Executive Committee that is taking over the transition management and comprises officers, assembly delegates, immediate past president, for 2018 the communications director as well.

This team will take over for the ad hoc Transition Steering Committee from 2017 and the Statewide Governance Committee in 2016 and hold a quarterly call to make decisions and measure progress.

The Transition Phase 2 action plan includes:

  • Strategic priorities summary
  • Proposed schedule and milestones
  • New organizational chart
  • New job descriptions
  • New manuals, along with volunteer and board training
  • Detailed activity and task recommendations
Phase Two: Big Projects

The Executive Committee will oversee six phase two projects in order to complete the smooth transition of three chapters into one chapter that’s built on operational and communications best practices.

The six big projects support the current strategic priorities:

Sustainable Systems

  • Integrated annual budget across programs to ensure cost effectiveness
  • Useful and ethical policies & procedures manual to steer volunteer-run operations
  • Revised bylaws approved by national to reflect the organizational and programming structure

Consummate Communications

  • Comprehensive marketing and communications plan that will include external and internal strategies, including considerations of how to deploy technology to unify members
  • Membership engagement survey to set a baseline for the chapter in 2018 and then enable regular feedback and measurement the “pulse of the membership”

Everybody Connects

  • New database tool for tracking membership engagement and relationship management
Changes, FAQ for 2018

The creation of next year’s priorities, projects and programs were all influenced by our Listening Tour where we learned ideas and input, plus heard concerns and barriers, directly from members.

We’ve integrated as much of our findings into the planning process as feasible for 2018, including these additional changes throughout the year.

January

With all 25 committee members committed, the Service team will provide volunteer orientations.

We will also host a virtual annual membership meeting.

Q: Why another annual meeting so soon?

A: Because currently our bylaws required an “annual meeting” hosted prior to Nov. 30 in order to elect a board, but the membership preferred an annual membership meeting as a “state of the union” to kick off the year. Once switched in 2018, then the next one will be January 2019. Elections will likely remain separate, administered remotely and electronically.

February

To reflect our broad geography, we will host quarterly, in-person board meetings around the region instead of monthly in-person board meetings.

Q: So the board will only meet 4 times?

A: Not quite. The Executive committee (comprising half the board) will meet quarterly and likely remotely,  the board will meet quarterly and in-person, and each of the six program committees (events, membership, service, advocacy, sponsorship, and communications) will meet quarterly and in-person ideally though perhaps more frequently via remote meetings, to make decisions and measure progress. That breaks down to about a monthly meeting and potential travel per board role, which seemed reasonable. Some will have more meetings if they also serve on a subcommittee.

April

We will start the nomination committee process earlier and hold the service draft in June to nominate board members, followed by the service draft in August to nominate committee members.

Q: Why start so soon in the year?

A: The nominating, recruitment and commitment process is a long one. So that board members can be elected prior to the PRSA International Conference, as and if amended in our bylaws, we need to start sooner than July like in the past.

 Phase You: Getting Involved

Throughout the year and during the Listening Tour, we’ve consistently heard how excited members are about the changes, process and progress. Our unofficial motto this year has been: “it takes a village.”

So, how can you help out next year?

  • Host a board meeting at your office
  • Suggest or introduce contacts at a destination venue for CommCon or Spotlights
  • Work with the events team to set up a tour at a local media outlet
  • Volunteer — one-time events, self service, currently open roles (check out our writer opening) or suggest something else!

Those are just a few starter ideas, we’d love to hear more. Please reach out to listening@prsaoregon.org.

Above And Beyond

Personally, I’m very proud of the Transition Steering Committee team:

BeverlyDaveDavid, ElisaJillLilyLoralynMaritzaMarkMeganSiobhan, TaylorTracey, and consultation from Colby and Brian – what we accomplished and the connections we made in the process with so many members around the region.

Instead of monthly conference calls, this team opted to meet in-person every month, offered up their offices to host (with AV and snacks!), and stayed well past the scheduled meeting time every month in order to plan effectively and execute comprehensively because, in their words’, “the work was just too important.”

We knew what an honor it was for the membership to entrust the Transition Steering Committee, in consultation with board, with the mission to smoothly integrate three chapters into one.

We feel confident that this founding year set a strong foundation for future leaders to meet the chapter’s and profession’s needs going forward. Vision 2020, here we come!

Yours in Service,
Julie

Julie Williams, APR, MA
2018 PRSA Oregon President-Elect
Transition Steering Committee Chair
Outreach Task Force Co-Chair

Annual Meeting & Elections

Save the Date!

After a successful merger year, it’s time to elect the 12-member PRSA Oregon Chapter Board of Directors for 2018. Please save-the-date for our 2017 annual meeting held on Nov. 8, 2017, at 6 p.m. from the comfort of your own home or office. You’ll get a chance to hear from current and incoming Chapter leadership about 2017 highlights and our financial status, about 2018 priorities and plans and vote on the incoming board. There will be time for Q&A with the new leadership! Slate will be announced by 10/25 at the latest. More event details and how to register to come.

 

Transition Steering Committee Report: September

Rethinking the 2018 Programming Schedule

programming planning 2018

Julie Williams, APR, leads the Transition Steering Committee as it compiles feedback from Eugene-, Portland- and Salem-area members into a proposed 2018 programming calendar.

Membership participation was encouraged and documented during the Listening Tour follow-up sessions in Eugene, Portland and Salem.  At our September Transition Steering Committee meeting, we reviewed members’ ideas about where, when and what programs would best meet their needs.

About 25 members participated in the brainstorming activity.  While that’s a small percentage of overall membership, they did represent many locations, industries, stages of career and background. And, their strategic thinking was fascinating! So many questions and valid concerns.

We factored in rationale about cost, travel, distance, time, priorities, resources, volunteer capacity, communication fatigue and more as we compiled the feedback into a proposed programming schedule for the 2018 PRSA Oregon Chapter board’s consideration.

Many thanks everyone who contributed to the process!

Along with completing the proposed calendar, which was identified as a priority output for 2017, September was highly productive:

  • The service draft shifted into its second phase and began filling committee positions, thanks to my Nominating Committee Co-ChairTaylor Long. We worked together to write new versions of all of the 37 job descriptions;
  • New chapter policies and procedures and a first-ever code of conduct are in the works, thanks to Secretary Tracey Lam;
  • Members received a summary of Listening Tour feedback in a mailer thanks to the membership committee which helped with distribution;
  • And with the in-person follow up portion of the Listening Tour  now concluded, as of the membership brunch in Eugene on Sept. 16, big props to Membership Director and Outreach Co-Chair Siobhan Taylor and the membership team.

Can’t wait to #suitup and come together as a chapter at the Oct. 20 Spotlight Awards!

Given everything we’ve accomplished together, it will be especially satisfying to celebrate this year.

Yours in Service,
Julie

Julie Williams, APR, MA
2018 PRSA Oregon President-Elect
Transition Steering Committee Chair
Outreach Task Force Co-Chair

Transition Steering Committee Report: July-August

Building A Foundation For 2018

July and August were milestone months for PRSA Oregon’s transition to a regional chapter.

We launched a service draft to fill board and committee positions for 2018 after all members were invited to volunteer for a role. With this input, the Nominating Committee, including all current board members,  gathered and selected nominees starting in July.

Part two of the service draft will include all nominees for incoming board positions as additional Nominating Committee members, to weigh in and help build their teams. Our goal was to ensure next year’s leaders represent the chapter’s geographic diversity and that the new team has plenty of time for onboarding folks from all over.

This new system was prototyped by last year’s Service Committee and validated by  feedback from this year’s Listening Tour. Its benefits include leadership succession planning for the continued growth and sustainability of the merged chapter.

Also in July, the Transition Steering Committee published a full report on feedback from the Listening Tour and mailed a summary to all members in late August.

In creating the report, we saw that the Becoming PRSA Oregon Communications Plan, which included Listening Tour activities, can serve as a model for engaging membership and supporting organizational change in any chapter.

We continued the Listening Tour sessions in Portland in June and in Salem during the member welcome brunch in August. It was fun to reconnect with members and report out what we learned and how we’re adapting already. We also eagerly collected input on chapter programming for next year.

The discussion sessions have exceeded our expectations. It’s encouraging to see such a high level of engagement – exactly what our members agreed was needed moving forward. All members are welcome to join the final session, which will be part of the member brunch in Eugene on Sept. 16.

During the summer, headway was also made on updating policies and procedures and developing a draft code of conduct, along with starting planning for the chapter’s leadership elections in November (date still to be determined).

The transition from three chapters to one regional organization has been time consuming, but  rewarding. It has required the Board of Directors and volunteers to spend way less time on direct programming and way more time on setting up operational systems and best practices. Short-term trade-offs for long-term benefits.

At a recent meeting, I asked the team: “What has been most rewarding for you this year?”

Some of the responses:

  • Seeing new members and prospective members be welcomed.
  • Watching #BecomingPRSAOregon (the communications plan) unfold and be embraced by members and watching them really getting it —and feeling excited about it!
  • Seeing the enthusiasm from members and volunteers about the new service draft process.
  • Experiencing the overall enthusiasm and support for transition at statewide level.

Thanks for sticking with us during this transition time.

Yours in Service,

Julie

Julie Williams, APR, MA
2018 PRSA Oregon President-Elect
Transition Steering Committee Chair
Outreach Task Force Co-Chair
Nominating Committee Co-Chair